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This week, we do a little talking about determiners, a topic that has come up before in many episodes but that we hadn’t really treated on its own.  Also, we get to reading some iTunes reviews we’ve been forgetting about.

Top of Show Greeting: Brazilian Portuguese (Vítor)

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Apologies for posting this so late.  Technical difficulties.

In this episode we explore the curious Himmaswa and its Chinese-inspired writing system.

Top of Show Greeting: Swiss German (Zurich dialect)

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This week, we have a relatively short discussion on the creation and fictional portrayal of multilingual conworlds.  It’s a linguistics-light topic, but we thought it might be useful.

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Azul*, guys: Read more »

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George and Mike have a wonderful conversation with Nizar Habash, creator of Delason.

Featured Conlang: Delason

Feedback:

Hi!
I discovered this podcast almost a month ago and I’m on episode 46. I’m actually not a conlanger, but I love linguistics and I love the discussions you guys have about different aspects of language. Thank you for producing such a fascinating show.
-Shaw
Birmingham, AL

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Today we tell you some techniques for using translations to flesh out your conlang.

Top of Show Greeting: Pahran (George’s work-in-progress conlang)

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William Annis gives us a wonderful review of how classification occurs in natural languages, and the many ways you can incorporate it in your langs.

(Small note, we will no longer be putting translated greetings on the short episodes.)

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Today we talk to Denis Moskowitz about his wonderful experiment Rikchik and the strange aliens who speak it.

Top of Show Greeting:  Forkëzoq

Feature Conlang: Rikchik

An image of a Rikchik signing.

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It took us two tries, but we managed to record an episode focusing entirely on tone systems.  Learn about how tonal languages work, how they develop historically, and a few little bits you can play with.

Top of Show Greeting: Frenkisch

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Hi George & co
After several months, I have finally caught up with all the Conlangery podcasts. I’m very impressed that you’ve kept them going so long and kept the standard up.
Can I suggest another area you might like to look at – language contact, particularly creoles and pidgins. A lot of conlangers model change within a family but there’s not many conlangs with more than one ancestor. Creoles and pidgins with their restricted vocabulary, morphology and word order might be good for beginners or for someone looking for a quick, fun project. Yet they can form larger projects to, e.g. if different registers are taken into account. You could base one on real world languages or on conlangs.
There’s some theoretical debate to be had there, too – Bickerton and other universalists versus those who favour socio-cultural explanations.

<Removed some links from the email for brevity, though those may surface in a future episode on creoles and pidgins>