Posted and filed under Podcast.

Alternate Title: Genders, Classes, and Agreement, oh my!

We talk today all about gender.  Or noun class.  Or both.  Really, they are the same thing, at least we think so.  Anyway, after a vivid and lively discussion on what can be done with the wonderful world of arbitrarily classifying nouns we review Taruven

Top of Show Greeting: Knæknæk

Links and Resources:

— Zompist on gender (More in the book.)

— WALS pages

— Interesting gender systems

Featured Conlang: Taruven (newer link here — the grammar we used is very old)

Feedback:

We won something! (Link may die.  Let me know if it does.)

Posted and filed under News.

Conlangery will be “blacked out” on Wed, January 18th in opposition to SOPA (HB3261: Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (SB968: Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011, aka PROTECT IP).  Behind those bureaucratic congressional names are two bills that could seriously damage the workings of the Internet.  As such, we have decided to join the protest against it.

The “blackout” will not actually shut off the site.  Instead, if you visit the website, you will receive a splash page with links to anti-SOPA sites as well as a way to click on through to our site.  Conlangery isn’t such a big megaphone, but I hope it will make some impact.

Posted and filed under Podcast.

We get right to it talking about suprasegmentals: mainly stress, phonation, tone, and nasalization.  After a long and fascinating (if incomplete) discussion, we finally get around to talking to DJP’s Kamakawi.

Top of Show Greeting: Kinál

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Kamakawi

Feedback:

Comment thread on #30

Some comments we mention specifically: Read more »

Posted and filed under Podcast.

George reveals a peeve, which leads to a bit of a tangent before we get to talking about the wonderful world of evidentials and all the stuff you can do with them.  Then we cover a very curious language by the name Talossan.

Top of Show Greeting: Gówa

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Talossan

Feedback:

Email from Arnt Richard Johansen: Read more »

Posted and filed under Podcast.

Today we talk about demonstratives.  Chiefly, what distinctions are common for demonstratives, and what crazy out-there distinctions you can make.  We also review a conlang that should be very familiar to you all.

Top of Show Greeting: Zelsen

Featured Conlang: Quenya

Feedback:

Email from Stephen Rogers: Read more »

Posted and filed under Podcast.

George has put up a grammar!  Also, we talk numerals — what base to use, how to construct higher numerals, cardinal vs ordinal, etc.  Then we feature a little bogolang called Wenedyk.

Top of the Show Greeting: Celinese

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Wenedyk

Feedback:

Email from Mathew Park: Read more »

Posted and filed under Podcast.

After some discussion of one little New York Times article that quoted William(!), we move along to talking about designing your sound system and romanization, though it’s mostly about romanization.  After that, we break a pattern and for the first time feature a natlang rather than a conlang — going from a grammar that just so happens to be the dissertation of one Mark Okrand.  The language is Mutsun.

Top of Show Greeting: Standard Sentalian

Links and Resources: George’s “Design Perameters for Romanization”

Featured NATLANG: Mutsun

Posted and filed under Podcast.

A very special guest host joins us for this episode, where we try to talk about correlatives as a thing, but as correlatives is actually many different things, we end up just talking about indefinites the whole time.  We have much more

Top of Show Greeting: pr̝̊ɛmɪsl

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Gomain

Feedback:

Koppa Dasao (comment on #26): Good news. Was at my check up Tuesday, and my kidneys are patching up. Now I got more than half-a-kidney sustaining me

 

Email:
James Campbell: Enjoyed episode 26 a great deal – no offence, but the editing definitely
helps the “listener experience”. The whole thing flows so much better.And yes, it looks like Basque does have a vigesimal system, and a pretty
sane one to boot. For a truly twisted vigesimal counting system, see Danish
(a system that was borrowed into/influenced Faroese, with further
extraordinary phonetic mangling – although it looks like Faroese has largely
changed over to a decimal system now).Owen: Way back, William mentioned using LaTeX and LyX to create documents and lexicons. I responded at the time to say I was trying those out, but I am struggling to figure out how I would convert a spreadsheet lexicon into dictionary form and wondered if William has any insight/ideas of how I can do this.Right now, my lexicon is a GoogleDoc spreadsheet with several columns:  word–pronunciation–englishequiv—wordtype—notes etc.  I would love to be able to present this in “OED” format, with nicer, longer descriptions and a uniform style.Thanks again for the podcast and your shared insights into language in general.

 

Posted and filed under News.

I have installed an add-on that will require you to copy and paste a password to post a comment.  This will hopefully eliminate the comment spam that I have to deal with daily.

Posted and filed under Podcast.

We start off with a reccomendation of sorts of the Speculative Grammarian Podcast, and George’s own long post on romanization.  Then we get into the meat of the show talking about all kinds of irregularity and “regular irregularity”.  Then we take a 180-degree turn and talk about the insanely regular Esperanto.

Top of Show Greeting: Ayeri

Featured Conlang: Esperanto (also here)

Feedback:

Email from Nathaniel: Read more »