Posted and filed under Podcast.

After a short update on rain in Wisconsin and ankle injuries, we try to make sense of the topic of topicalization and topic prominent languages.  Then we talk about Talmit, a language created by active Conlangery listener and commenter Roman Rausch

Top of Show Greeting: Grewa

Resources:

Featured Conlang: Talmit (LCC talk, pdf grammar, more stuff)

Feedback:

Email from Alex: Read more »

Posted and filed under Podcast.

For our 52nd episode we decided to take a break from our usual format and just have a good time talking about movies and TV shows — with a conlang twist.  So, here we are listening to a bunch of conlang (and pseudo-conlang) dialogue from various properties and talking a little about what we like and don’t like.  Enjoy!

Top of Show Greeting: Doon

Properties Featured:

Bonus — a quiz we found on fictional languages.

Posted and filed under Podcast.

We go a little out of our comfort zone and talk about language history — particularly as involves the diachronic method of creating a conlang.  Then we move on to some talk about a language called Dimana Lokud.

Top of Show Greeting: Oupe

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Dimana Lokud

Posted and filed under Podcast.

In today’s bonus-size episode we have Carsten Becker on to join in a great discussion on the technologies of writing:  implements, media, formats, and even literacy itself.  Then we have an invigorating discussion with Larry Sulky about his “artlangy-engelang” Qakwan, among other things.

Top of Show Greeting: Treyll

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Qakwan

Posted and filed under Podcast.

Posted and filed under Podcast.

After a discussion of George’s recent consumption of bear meat, we get to talking about designing your sound system, a topic we meant to talk about in episode 29 but somehow didn’t end up saying much about.  After a long discussion about that topic, we feature perhaps the second most famous auxlang in history, which goes by the terrible name of Volapük.

Top of Show Greeting: Quenya (translation by Roman Rausch)

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Volapük (“Handbook”, Wikipedia, Volapük.com)

 

Posted and filed under Podcast.

Today we talk about something we wish more conlangers would think about creating — isolating and analytic languages.  It seems that virtually everyone wants some polysynthetic madness or at least a complex verb paradigm, but there are ways to make isolation and analytic syntax interesting, we promise!  Also, Taila

Top of Show Greeting: Hra’anh

Links and Resources:

Featured Conlang: Taila

Posted and filed under Podcast.

Check out the Serpent’s Tongue kickstarter I mentioned at the top of the show!

After teasing Mike a bit about his trip to an Anime convention, we get down to business on how to make your conlang fit into a conworld.  Then we cover an interesting and enigmatically-named Arka language.

Top of Show Greeting: German (translation by Carsten Becker) [NOTE: Yes, we are now accepting natlang greetings from native speakers]

Featured Conlang: Iŋomœ́ (Akana Wiki Page)

Feedback:

Read more »

Posted and filed under News.

As happens every so often, we’re scraping the bottom of the barrel on conlangs as of late, so I thought I would appeal to the audience to help us find some gems to feature on the show.  We’re looking for linguistically sophisticated conlangs with good documentation.  It doesn’t have to be a whole book, of course … just enough content for us to talk for about 20 minutes about.  You can consult our episode list to see what conlangs have been featured previously and email suggestions to conlangery@gmail.com.

Also, I am out of top-of-show greetings — another common occurrence.  You can find out how to submit those on our contribute page.

Thanks!

UPDATE:  A viewer has convinced me to accept translations of the top-of-show greeting into natlangs, given that those translations come from native speakers.  So, if your native language is something other than English, feel free to contribute a translation.  So far we have a German one which will be used for the next episode (#46).

Posted and filed under Podcast.

This week we talk about the many peculiarities of how questions can be handled in your language.  Join us as we explore not only polar and content questions, but also talk about rhetorical and conjectural ones as well, with some insight on how different languages handle them.  We also have a natlang featured today, one that I’m sure many people will be familiar with.

Top of Show Greeting: Wateu

Links and Resources:

Featured NATLANG: Welsh (Early and Middle)

Feedback:

In lieu of a regular feedback, we read some of our iTunes reviews.  Unfortunately, I cannot copy-paste from iTunes and really don’t want to retype them, but I will link to Literal Minded’s blog post where he linked to us — you should have a look see at that guy.