Conlangery 121 medallion

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We bring on our long time “frenemy” David Peterson to talk about Trigedasleng, the future English conlang he created for the CW show The 100.

Top of Show Greeting: Noserliq (< q > = [ŋ])

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11 Responses to “Conlangery #121: Trigedasleng”

  1. Vítor De Araújo

    Just a random comment on using the definite article with proper names (which I may have already commented about here, but I’m not sure): it’s pretty common in Portuguese (more so in some varieties than in others). In my native dialect at least it is standard in the colloquial language; if you omit the article it sounds high-register/formal, and you mostly see that in writing, news broadcasts, and the like.

    Also, in the shownotes the became a quotation tag.

    Reply
    • /sɑɪ̯f ɑsɑd ɑˈsːətjə/

      I could’ve sworn that my friend’s father in high school, a native Spanish speaker from Guatemala, would sometimes reference me in a sentence as el Nat (Nat being my given name). I didn’t think he was being cute or fanciful, but maybe I got the wrong idea. This episode of conlangery advises me that this is not done.

      Reply
      • admin

        It’s possible that some Spanish speakers do use articles with names. Don’t take our word for it. Spanish is a big language with a lot of variation. I only know what I’ve learned at school, and I think David’s primary exposure is through Spanish speaking family members

        Reply
        • trejiokla

          In Argentina, people with lack of education use the articles with name: “la Jessica”, “el Adrián”; this use is a sign of lower class. However, if the name is a ‘nickname’, it is allowed: “la Vicky”, “el Emi” are used even by educated people, but this usage is very odd.

          Reply
  2. Pete Bleackley

    “Laik” preserving a diphthong that simplifies elsewhere seems plausible because it’s the copula, and copulas tend to be reservoirs of oddity.

    Having said that, I now think “Reservoirs of Oddity” would be a great album name.

    Reply
  3. Lao Kou

    With regard to : I keep an entry count of the Géarthnuns – English/English – Géarthnuns dictionaries, and I noticed a long time ago that initial was going nuts on both sides. In an attempt to curtail “Englishiness” I put a temporary moratorium on new Géarthnuns words beginning with , other than those already coming from extant roots (that moratorium has been in place over ten years now.). I was really hoping it would be that would advance to #1, but instead it has been and moving ahead of the pack — has a respectable showing. It’s dictionary entries only, so and are undistinguished on the English side, whereas they’re different letters in Géarthnuns. Only recently has the moratorium been somewhat lifted and entry counts, for whatever they’re worth or mean, feel a bit more balanced.

    Also for a relatively young a posteriori lang project, Japoné語, on the English side of the lexicon (now approaching the 500-entry range), and are as David puts it, “leading the charge”. We’ll see how that plays out, as I have less control over an a posteriori vocab. My count is merely limited to spelling, but I find it interesting that others might keep record of such things.

    Reply
  4. Lao Kou

    With regard to*s* : I keep an entry count of the Géarthnuns – English/English – Géarthnuns dictionaries, and I noticed a long time ago that initial *s* was going nuts on both sides. In an attempt to curtail “Englishiness” I put a temporary moratorium on new Géarthnuns words beginning with *s*, other than those already coming from extant roots (that moratorium has been in place over ten years now.). I was really hoping it would be *v* that would advance to #1, but instead it has been *g* and *t*_ moving ahead of the pack — *v* has a respectable showing. It’s dictionary entries only, so *s* and *sh* are undistinguished on the English side, whereas they’re different letters in Géarthnuns. Only recently has the moratorium been somewhat lifted and entry counts, for whatever they’re worth or mean, feel a bit more balanced.

    Also for a relatively young a posteriori lang project, Japoné語, on the English side of the lexicon (now approaching the 500-entry range), and are as David puts it, “leading the charge”. We’ll see how that plays out, as I have less control over an a posteriori vocab. My count is merely limited to spelling, but I find it interesting that others might keep record of such things.

    Reply
  5. Okuno Zankoku

    “the easiest language for an English speaker to learn in the world”
    Well, there’s Scots… but I get you.

    I listened to a few samples, and It sounded like like the translation of “alliance” was derived from “hook up”. Maybe I’m imagining it, because I’m one of those people that don’t quite get it, but it’s an interesting semantic shift anyway. It’s fascinating to even think that a language could be the opposite of what is an English re-skin, even though it’s derived from English, how much more to see it in action.

    Once again, I may end up watching a show solely because DJP made a language for it.

    Reply

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