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We finish out our Holy Trinity of Verbs with Mood — a slippery, slippery subject if there ever was one.  Of course, after trying to make some sense out of that, we move on to review South Eresian

Top of Show Greeting: tzoi

Rescources:

Conlang: South Eresian (blog)
Feedback:
Email from James Campbell:
You’re up early :-)I keep meaning to suggest dialects as a topic for discussion. We English speakers tend not to realise the extraordinary divergence that can be found in dialects, but my exposure to North Norwegian dialects over the last decade or so and (briefly last month) a West Flemish dialect has demonstrated to me that it’s not just a case of a little non-standard grammar and some unusual terms for fish and farming equipment, as one might think from the situation in England these days. What gets me is the differences in pronouns. Allow me to illustrate:Where standard written Norwegian (bokmål) has “jeg”/”meg” for “I”/”me”, Northern Norwegian has “æ”/”mæ”. For “you” (plural), instead of “dere” Northern Norwegian has “dokker”. Which I like a lot.My friends from near Ostend in Belgium informed me that their local dialect of Flemish also has some interesting pronoun forms. For “I”/”me”, where standard Dutch has “ik”/”me/mij” they have “ekke”/”min”. The plural pronouns are fantastic:
Std Dutch  dialect
nom/acc nom/acc

we wij/ons    widder/us
you   jullie/jullie   gidder/junder
they  zij/hen    zidder/under

This just blows my mind. It goes to show that there is more to language evolution than regular sound changes 🙂 Makes me wonder whether small populations are less conservative and more radical in their language changes than large populations are. I need to do more work on Jameld dialects now…

Keep up the good work on the podcast – always enjoyable.

James

mood as people?

7 Responses to “Conlangery #18: Mood”

  1. James Campbell

    What I should’ve said was “the situation in rural England”, of course. Especially in the south, where I am. I’m aware that urban dialects, and World English, are a completely different riverbank (as they’d say in Jameld).

    Reply
  2. Koppa Dasao

    You asked for it…

    I: jeg, /jej/, e, /e:/, æ: /æ:/, i, /i:/
    Me: meg: /mej/, mæ: /mæ:/

    And try this one on the show:
    – /æ æ a ɔ eder/
    – /ɔ æ an a ɔ eder/
    Translation is as follows:
    – I’m off for a meal
    – Oh, is he off for a meal.

    Reply
  3. Koppa Dasao

    Btw, can I mess a little more with your heads?

    Try out these Norwegian sentences:
    Ber bønder bønner over bønner?
    /ber bønner bønner ɔver bønner/
    Does farmers say praises over beans?

    Fatter fatter at en mutter ikke er mutter?
    /fatter fatter at en mʉtter ikke er mʉtter/
    Does father understand that a nut is not mother?

    Leker dokker med dukker?
    /leker dɔkker me dɔkker/
    Do you (plural) play with dolls?

    So how does Norwegian keep these words from each other? Easy. Norwegian is a tonal language. Stress and tone changes the meaning of equally sounding words.

    Reply
  4. Kenneth Nyman

    I’ve been thinking about mood as closely related to the philosophical notion of speech acts. Clearly an imperative statement is another speech act than an indicative one; thus I see no reason not to treat the imperative as a mood.

    Reply
    • Ossicone

      It is generally treated as a mood. It’s just the ugly duckling of moods – it just doesn’t quite fit in.

      Reply
  5. Hans Georg Lundahl

    Std Dutch dialect
    nom/acc nom/acc

    we wij/ons widder/us
    you jullie/jullie gidder/junder
    they zij/hen zidder/under

    This just blows my mind. It goes to show that there is more to language evolution than regular sound changes
    __________________________________

    Correct so far.

    _________________________________

    Makes me wonder whether small populations are less conservative and more radical in their language changes than large populations are.
    _________________________________

    It’s more like the small populations have kept other original pronouns. In this case more like old duals.

    In Standard Dutch, jullie is anyway an innovation, very recent, replacing sth else.

    Reply

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